Baby Steps

Film poster, displayed under fair use as documented on Wikimedia Commons.

If you’ve seen the delightful comedy movie, What About Bob?, you are no doubt smiling at my title.

Bob is a neurotic and thoroughly irritating patient who depends on his psychotherapist for lots of emotional strokes and life coaching. He ingratiates himself with the therapist’s family and gets himself invited to be their guest on a weekend getaway, against the protests of the therapist. He then proceeds to drive the therapist crazy.

One of Bob’s favorite phrases is “baby steps,” which captures the therapist’s advice to solve problems a little bit at a time, rather than in overwhelming chunks.

“Baby steps” is surprisingly good advice for many questions in software design. It doesn’t apply in all cases, but it applies far more often than it ends up being used.

The Purpose of Design

We create UML diagrams, personas, design docs, lo-fi mockups, and other artifacts to capture our architectural thinking because they provide us with a roadmap of sorts. We need to identify and steer to a consistent point of the compass if we want to produce complex artifacts that meet customer needs. The bigger and more diversified our teams get, and the more moving parts we’re orchestrating into our software, the more important this is.

However, all of these artifacts are means to an end. To whit: Continue reading