Paying Off Technical Debt

We don’t get spam about how to consolidate our technical debts. :-) Image credit: Alan Cleaver (Flickr)

“Interest never sleeps nor sickens nor dies; it never goes to the hospital; it works on Sundays and holidays; it never takes a vacation; it never visits nor travels; it takes no pleasure; it is never laid off work nor discharged from employment; it never works on reduced hours. . . . Once in debt, interest is your companion every minute of the day and night; you cannot shun it or slip away from it; you cannot dismiss it; it yields neither to entreaties, demands, or orders; and whenever you get in its way or cross its course or fail to meet its demands, it crushes you.”

J. Reuben Clark

In my recent post about how organizations forget technical debt, I glossed over some important details. When you’re in debt, you have an obligation to pay somebody back. So: with technical debt, who must you pay, and how?

More than just a code problem

A simplistic view–one that I’ve used for years–understands debt mainly as a deficiency in code. In this view, you pay yourself back by making the code better. Most discussions about technical debt take this view. It’s natural, and true, and useful.

However, I don’t think it’s the full story.

It’s good practice to borrow money from yourself. If you do things this way, you save a bunch of capital, and then you borrow against your own reserves. Paying yourself back consists of transferring money back into your own savings.

This is hard, and making large purchases this way requires years of prior planning and discipline.

A more common way to borrow is Continue reading