Why Your Software Should Cry

The problem of pain has bothered philosophers–particularly those with a religious bent–for a long time. What might be the purpose of suffering, they’ve wondered, and how does it relate to the human experience?

But pain barely impinges on the thinking of software engineers at all. Computers never wince, or complain, or mourn the loss of a favorite program (Marvin the paranoid android excepted). An OS runs at full speed until the instant when its kernel “panics” without warning; once you reboot, it acts as if nothing ever happened. No sniffles, no whimpers, no scabs…

photo credit: nanny snowflake (Flickr)

This is unfortunate.

Reaction to stimuli is one of the 8 characteristics of life. That means that living things are aware, in some sense, of their relationship to the larger environment. They distinguish between good and bad stimuli. They hurt. And they learn from their pain.

Lessons from a protist

This ability to use pain is not limited to complex organisms. The lowly Stentor roeselii (a single-celled protozoan that anchors for filter feeding) exhibits an incredible repertoire of behaviors to optimize its relationship with the environment. Squirt it with water from a pipette, and it contracts for defense. 30 seconds later, it unfurls again. Keep squirting, and it eventually learns to ignore the false alarms.

Gently introduce a poison into the water current, Continue reading

6 Strategies to Simplify Software

How do you make things simple?

I’ve written that simplicity is powerful, and that it undergirds many deep architectural breakthroughs. In posts about pragmatism and balance, I’ve quoted Oliver Wendell Holmes about the simplicity on the other side of complexity.

But I’ve never talked about how to achieve it.

photo credit: hurley gurley (Flickr)

This is not an easy question; if we knew how to make things simple, we’d do it more often and more quickly. It takes some serious effort (and genius) to go from centuries of experiments and volumes of equations to e = mc2. I’ve been pondering simplicity in software architecture for a decade, and I’m certain I’ve only scratched the surface.

Still, simplicity is a learnable skill, and some strategies are consistently helpful… Continue reading