Good fences make good neighbors

In Robert Frost’s poem, “Mending Wall”, two farmers meet each spring to rebuild the rock wall between their properties. One farmer is the narrator. He notes that the unseen forces of winter and weather always cause some decay (“something there is that doesn’t love a wall”), and he wonders why the wall is necessary. There’s apple orchard on one side, and pine forest on the other–it’s not as if something will be kept in or out. The other farmer answers with the repeated aphorism “good fences make good neighbors.”

photo credit: DragonWoman (Flickr)

This poem could be a treatise for the principle of encapsulation in software. In software as in life:

  • Something there is that doesn’t love a wall.
  • Good fences make good neighbors.

What doesn’t love a wall?

Subroutines, formal interfaces, data hiding, class hierarchies, the pimpl idiom, and similar mechanisms all create barriers in software between consumers and providers of functionality. These techniques are well known, but we still have codebases littered with protected data members, unnecessary class declarations in headers, goto, and other suboptimal choices.

Why? Continue reading