How Enums Spread Disease — And How To Cure It

Poorly handled enums can infect code with fragility and tight coupling like a digital Typhoid Mary.

Say you’re writing software that optimizes traffic flow patterns, and you need to model different vehicle types. So you code up something like this:

vehicle_type.h

enum VehicleType {
    eVTCar,
    eVTMotorcycle,
    eVTTruck,
    eVTSemi,
};

Then you press your enum into service:

route.cpp

if (vehicle.vt == eVTSemi || vehicle.vt == eVTTruck) {
    // These vehicle types sometimes have unusual weight, so we 
    // have to test whether they can use old bridges...
    if (vehicle.getWeight() > bridge.getMaxWeight()) {

Quickly your enum becomes handy in lots of other places as well:

if (vehicle.vt == eVTMotorcycle) {
    // vehicle is particularly sensitive to slippery roads

And…

switch (vehicle.vt) {
case eVTTruck:
case eVTSemi:
    // can't use high-occupancy/fuel-efficient lane
case eVTMotorcycle:
    // can always use high-occupancy/fuel-efficient lane
default:
    // can only use lane during off-peak hours
}

Diagnosis

The infection from your enum is already coursing through the bloodstream at this point. Do you recognize the warning signs?

  • Knowledge about the semantics of each member of the enum are spread throughout the code.
  • The members of the enum are incomplete. How will we account for cranes and bulldozers and tractors and vans?
  • Semantics are unsatisfying. We’re saying cars are never gas guzzlers or gas savers; what about massive old steel-framed jalopies and tiny new hybrids?

A vehicle that challenges our tidy enum. Photo credit: Manila Imperial Motor Sales (Flickr)

The infection amplifies when we want to represent the enum in a config file or a UI. Now we need to Continue reading